When you upload a file, such as an image or document, Confluence attaches it to the current page. 

You can then display the file on the page as a link or an image, or you can use a macro to embed it in the page. 

To upload a file, you'll need the 'Add Attachments' space permission.


Pages in your site may use the new editor or the legacy editor. This page explains how to use both editors.


Use these links to jump to the section detailing the editor you use:


Which editor does your page use

When you edit a page, you can look over the toolbar for visual indicators, like the differences between the text color pickers or the inclusion of an emoji icon in the new editor toolbar. You'll also notice that the Publish and Close buttons were moved to the top right in the new editor.

New editor

Legacy editor


New editor

This section provides the details for uploading files using the new editor.

Upload a file

There are two ways to attach a file to a page you are editing:

  • Drag the file directly onto the page. 
  • Click the Files & images icon in the toolbar, and upload a file.

There are two ways to attach a file to a page you are viewing:

  • Drag the file directly onto the page.
  • Go to ••• > Attachments, and upload a file.

Regardless of the state of the page, you can upload multiple files at a time.  

Accepted file types and size

Confluence allows you to attach most file types, but you can't attach folders (including folders created by applications like Keynote). If you'd like to upload a folder, export it to a zip file or other compressed format, then upload to Confluence. 

Although just about any file type can be attached to a page, not all file types can be displayed on or embedded in a page. For more information, see Display files and images. Files must be under 100 MB.

File versions

If you upload a file with the same name as an existing attachment on the same page, Confluence overwrites the existing attachment. Confluence maintains version history for all attachments. For more information, see Manage files

Changes you make to the source file won't affect attachments in Confluence. To update a file you've attached to a Confluence page, upload a new version of the file.

Notes

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(warning) Avoid using special characters in page or attachment names, as the page or attachment may not be found by Confluence search and may cause some Confluence functions to behave unexpectedly.

Legacy editor

This section provides the details for uploading files using the legacy editor.


Upload a file



There are many ways to attach a file to a page.  


In the editor you can:


  • Drag the file directly onto the page. 
  • Go to Insert > Files and images and upload a file.





When viewing a page you can:


  • Drag the file directly onto the page.
  • Go to Actions menu icon > Attachments and upload a file.


You can attach multiple files at a time.  


Accepted file types and size


Confluence allows you to attach most file types, but you can't attach folders (including folders created by applications like Keynote). If you'd like to upload a folder, export it to a zip file or other compressed format, then upload to Confluence. 


Although just about any file type can be attached to a page, not all file types can be displayed on or embedded in a page. For more information, see Display files and images. Files must be under 100 MB.


File versions


If you upload a file with the same name as an existing attachment on the same page, Confluence will overwrite the existing attachment. Confluence maintains version history for all attachments. For more information, see Manage files


Changes you make to the source file won't affect attachments in Confluence. To update a file you've attached to a Confluence page, upload a new version of the file.


Notes


robotsnoindex
robotsnoindex
robotsnoindex

(warning) Avoid using special characters in page or attachment names, as the page or attachment may not be found by Confluence search and may cause some Confluence functions to behave unexpectedly.