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Even though a page may look great within Confluence, it will end up looking a bit different when exported to a PDF document. The most important change you need to be aware of occurs when you have tables on your page, especially when they contain images.

Why are tables particularly problematic? PDF documents are almost always going to be narrower than your screen width, so we have to try and fit the same amount of content in less space. For most content, this isn’t a huge deal - text just spills onto the next line.

However, rows within tables can’t do that - they have to stay as one unbroken row! When you have unbreakable content in a table, like images, there is a chance that it might get cut off because it won’t fit any more.

Here’s an example:

Confluence view


PDF view

What can I do to make sure my tables don’t get cut off?

The easiest way to get around this is to try and keep your tables narrow. Here are a few things you can try:

  • Resize your images to be a bit smaller when they’re inside a table.

  • Invert the rows and columns so that your table gets taller rather than getting wider. As an example:

First name

Last name

D.O.B

Hair color

Eye color

Shirt size

John

Doe

Black

Brown

Medium

First name

John

Last name

Doe

D.O.B

Hair color

Black

Eye color

Brown

Shirt size

Medium

Customize Exports to PDF

Using a combination of HTML and CSS, each space in your Confluence instance can have its own customized export.

Customize Exports to PDF